Friday, September 12, 2008

Children's books are there with us from the beginning

From before were even born, our mothers have already started a collection of children's books for us. About 40 or 50 sitting on a small old wooden bookshelf in what is to be our room. She took time to pick each individual book that she knew would have a good enough story that would eventually stay with us for the rest of our lives. What a gift she gave us.

beginning

Thursday, September 11, 2008

The Benefits of Children’s Audio Books

There is a stigma that parents who let their children listen to audio books are depriving them of one thing or another. Whether it’s bonding time with their children or taking away the joy of reading, it’s just not true. Using audio books with your young child may very well be increasing a number of their developing skills. Here are a few reasons children’s audio books are a great learning tool.
Not all parents are the greatest readers. When children are toddlers, parents often read books to them near bedtime. Audio books use professional actors to record their story. Their voices are often smoother, softer and have more passion for the story. Parents spend so much time with work, their families and household chores that they can usually be wiped out and tired come reading time. If children are listening to someone read the story with enthusiasm, they’re more likely to respond to the story better.
A well-composed audio book will have a musical score and sound effects appropriate to the storyline. This will grasp a child’s attention and help them to visualize the story better, thus improving their creativity. They will hear words being pronounced correctly, and their vocabularies will start to blossom. Parents are quick to cast away audio books, but not realize that a lot of popular children’s toys talk and play music just like these books do; yet parents will continue to purchase these items.
As the children grow up listening to audio books, they’ll come to understand that they can read more stories by the same authors if they’re interested. Children who see movies or television shows they like will often buy books based off of their favorite characters. Audio books work the same way. The children will want to continue enjoying their favorite characters and authors. If anything, children’s audio books promote reading.
It’s important to develop listening skills in children at an early age. Audio books for children teach them that skill. Children know that they must remain attentive to hear the full story, and that’s important for them once they begin school. Learning to listen as toddlers through audio books will help polish their attentiveness for later in life.
Using audio books while on travel is a great idea. It’s better than putting a non-educational DVD in while on the road. It can become a family affair. The book can be paused, and the whole family can discuss what they think may happen next, or how they feel about particular characters. This will polish the child’s conversational skills and prove to be a great learning experience for the child. It also helps to bring families closer together.
So parents should think twice before tossing the idea of children’s audio books aside. There are so many great benefits children can gain from listening to these stories. They’ll gain valuable thinking, listening and conversational skills that will help them in life for many years to come.
For a great selection of children’s audio books including free audiobook downloads, please visit http://www.audiobookfest.com
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jeannie_Warner



Children’s Books - Child’s First Introduction to The World of Print

Board books are often a child’s first introduction to the world of print. Designed with infants and toddlers in mind, these specialty children’s books are chunky, with thick, study pages perfect for a young child’s exploring touch. Like most children’s books, board books are usually labeled with a target age range by the publisher. Board books are generally intended for children from birth to three years old.
Early children’s books come in many titles. Many classics of children’s literature are available in board book format, from the works of Dr. Seuss to bedtime staples like Goodnight Moon. These titles allow even the very youngest children to enjoy the whimsical stories and colorful illustrations of favorite stories without worry about torn pages.
Pocket sized board books often come in themed collections. Favorite children’s characters often star in collections of board books, which often come in creative packaging, intended to make getting the books out and putting them away just as much fun for your child as reading them. Other collections focus on a theme, such as letters of the alphabet.
Perhaps the most popular style of board book is the simple picture book. Each heavy, cardboard page contains a single word or concept, paired with a matching illustration. Available on subjects from dinosaurs and cars to colors and shapes, these children’s books build familiarity with basic early learning concepts and introduce the idea that words represent things we see around us.
Board books come in a range of different sizes. Small, pocket sized board books are perfect for crawling infants who are just learning to manipulate objects, while larger books are ideal for the toddler who wants a book just like Mommy’s.
The physical construction of board books is designed to withstand the rough treatment of children too young to know better. Unlike traditional bound paper books, the thick cardboard pages of board books are virtually indestructible. They resist tearing and make it easier for clumsy young fingers to turn pages.
Board books are also an exceptionally affordable addition to the family library. Small full color picture books are often priced at just a few dollars per title, while larger, full size full color books are priced around the same as hardcover children’s books. Building a collection of board books for the child in you life is an inexpensive way to provide an early introduction to the importance and enjoyment of reading.
Online Books Store Canada Deals ON Books Canada, where you can buy your books online and choose from biggest selection of books
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Angel_Abdulnor



Grandpa for Sale! - A Children’s Book Pick of the Week From the Writing for Children Center

Here’s a new picture book destined to become a favorite of children of all ages everywhere!
Young Lizzie is minding the family antique store, carefully dusting all the priceless antiques while her grandpa snoozes on a Louis XVI settee.
For good measure, Lizzie even dusts Grandpa’s bald head as he naps.
The bell over the door tinkles as a woman named Mrs. Bradley Larchmont the Third (no less) breezes in wearing a pink stole and suit, carrying a matching miniature poodle in her arms.
Mrs. Larchmont is on a buying spree, loading Lizzie down with all of her purchases, when she suddenly spies something she definitely must have - Grandpa!
When Lizzie tells Mrs. Larchmont that Grandpa is not for sale, Mrs. Larchmont pooh-poohs that idea, saying, “Nonsense, my dear. Everyone has a price.”
And the price Mrs. Larchmont is willing to pay for Grandpa keeps getting higher and higher.
Readers of all ages will identify with Lizzie as she carefully considers what she could do with all the money each time Mrs. Larchmont ups the price she’s willing to pay for Grandpa.
Rich, vibrant illustrations by T. Kyle Gentry add to the fun revealing what Lizzie envisions doing if she accepts any of Mrs. Larchmont’s offers.
This delightful new picture book by authors Dotti Enderle and Vicki Sansum does such a great job of what picture books are designed to do - engage young readers (and listeners) in an interesting story told through a mix of text and pictures, written with just enough predictability to gently pull them along to a surprising but satisfying conclusion.
There’s even a surprise added bonus on the back cover of the book. But I won’t give that away here.
This book is another sure winner from Flashlight Press.
Grandpa for Sale!Written by Dotti Enderle and Vicki SansumIllustrated by T. Kyle GentryHardcover, 32 full color pages, ages 4-8Publisher: Flashlight PressISBN-13 9780972922586ISBN-10 097292258XPublication: April 2007
Suzanne Lieurance is a children’s author, freelance writer, and The Working Writer’s Coach. Visit the Writing for Children Center at http://www.writingforchildren.com for more information about children’s books and other works for young readers, and also find out how to join the Children’s Writers Coaching Club. Sign up for The Morning Nudge - daily words of inspiration and motivation for writers at http://www.workingwriterscoach.com
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Suzanne_Lieurance



Action in Children’s Books

The June 2007 issue of The Writer included interesting articles about writing for children. Since I have been editing, formatting, and organizing children’s stories and illustrations into books to be published for the past few months, I found the articles interesting and parallel to my own experiences and what I have found that children’s stories need.
Just because a book is for children does not mean that it can be telling and not showing. In fact more showing through words as well as illustrations enhances the book. In every book, tension gets a child’s attention, and drama requires tension. Barbara Seuling (”HOW TO REFINE your picture book, page 38, The Writer, June 2007) says that an incident is not enough, that the author must turn it into a story with action. “…it is the element of tension that gets our interest. A story without something to worry the reader is just mildly interesting at best.”
Yes, action adds to drama. Children like action. They demand action. Not enough action results in lack of interest. Without action, where’s the drama? It doesn’t exist.
Speaking of action, Seuling and a speaker at the OWFI Oklahoma Writers Federation Inc.) writing conference, Marion Hees, agree that writers should start with action almost immediately. Writers shouldn’t start with exposition, at least not more than a sentence or two, before the action begins. Catching the listener’s or reader’s attention quickly means a better chance of keeping the attention.
Children enjoy drama, a story with a character who has a dilemma. Writers need to incorporate drama in each story.
A few points for writing better children’s stories
* Don’t be afraid to use some unfamiliar words. Most children listen to picture books text; they don’t read them. Therefore, vocabulary can be more exciting.
* Be sure the story isn’t too long, even though they can be up to 1,500 words. Seuling says, “Say what you have to say as succinctly as possible. Cut unnecessary words; avoid details that are unneeded or can be left to the illustrator; and write shorter sentences, selecting verbs with kick.”
* Exclamation points should be use seldom and only in dialogue. Clear writing helps avoid exclamation marks.
* Avoid using ALL CAPS. If a character shouts, show that with words and how they are said.
* Italics should be used only to show a character’s thoughts.
* As in any writing, action verbs need to be used. Passive voice or verbs and to be verbs should be avoided whenever possible.
Example; The girl was talking to her doll.
Improved: The girl talked to her doll.
A couple of things I read and heard I disagree with:
Avoid alliteration in names: Children love alliterative names. Adults who decide what is published and what isn’t are the ones who dictate no alliteration. If writing for children, then I think we should use devices that they enjoy - if used correctly.
Don’t write in rhyme. I partially disagree. IF rhyme and rhythm are used by someone who understands how to do so, then rhyme holds children’s attention.
Don’t be afraid to write for children. Just be sure that the perspective is on a child’s level, written for children rather than just about children but for adults. Drama must be included to keep a child’s attention.
After teaching composition for twenty-five years and becoming an author on http://www.Writing.Com/ a site for Poetry, Vivian Gilbert Zabel, also writing as V. Gilbert Zabel, produced Hidden Lies and Other Stores, Walking the Earth:, and The Base Stealers Club, which can be ordered through most book stores and on Amazon.com.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Vivian_Gilbert_Zabel



Top Ten Creators of Cute Art

Cute art is important to people, and not simply as nursery art, but as a means of showing some of the most important human emotions. Such art shows sentiment, joyful memories, and love as few things can, and so is important to humanity. This is a list of some of the greatest creators of cute art, it is not in any particular order, for it is impossible to pass judgment on who’s art is better among masters.
Robert McCloskey
An illustrator of children’s books with two Caldecott Medals, McCloskey is a classically trained artist who created cute and sentimental works of art. His works have inspired many other artists and one of his books “Make Way for Ducklings” even has a statue dedicated to it in Boston.
Fred Moore
One of the few artists who would have the distinction of training the greatest artists at Disney. Fred Moore redesigned Mickey to be the cute and wonderful icon we know today. His personal art was also very whimsical and cute as well.
Mary Blair
One of the concept artists for Disney, she was behind the scenes of many of his early movies from Alice in Wonderland to Peter Pan. Her cute and intelligent works of art helped to inspire many of the masters at Disney.
Ezra Jack Keats
Rare among the creators of cute art and children’s books, Keats lived and worked in the poorer districts of New York, where he depicted the children and play in dirty and graffiti covered streets. He showed the warmth and love that existed in all conditions.
Jody Bergsma
Less known then the others on this list Bergsma’s work is imaginative and beautiful, from cute dragons to unicorns to children and bunnies her cute art tells stories.
Barbara Lavallee
Barbara Lavallee is another little known artist, with a few children’s books which can at times be found in book stores she is a little better known then Bergsma. Her work is amazingly stunning, a glimpse into the every day life and concerns of a world few will ever experience. The people she draws are rounded and warm, with an energy and variance that few artists can match.
Molly Bang
A children’s book illustrator who creates works of art which depict emotion as few other artists have been able to. Through her works of art she draws people into a story and holds them until long after the story has ended.
Eleanor Campbell
Though her name is relatively unknown she was the primary illustrator behind “Dick and Jane” the series of books which helped teach millions of children to read. Her cute art depicted a better world.
Beatrix Potter
The amazing thing about Beatrix was her ability to be one of the first to make pictures so sentimental, with cute animals living sweet English lives. Her pictures are filled with emotion, beautiful in their soft style, and form. Few people manage to succeed when they are in their thirties with no background of success, most who make it do so early or not at all. Beatrix Potter’s art was beautiful enough to make her a rare exception to this rule.
Samuel Butcher
Precious Moments, the name is sentimental and brilliantly chosen as was having Samuel Butcher do the initial designs for these works. He is a stunning artist; his illustrations speak of the joy of children, not so much the joy of being one but the joy of having one. This is what makes his cute art so amazing, because it shows why people still choose to be parents and still wish to be grandparents inspire of the hardship of being a parent.
Ty Hulse is a creator of cute art and nursery art for the site Kayart.net Cute Art, and Baby Room Decor. This site is dedicated to helping expand the appreciation for works of cute art and to help artists who sell such art. Currently the site is featuring Cute Dragons. It also has numerous articles on Nursery Decoration ideas
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Ty_Hulse

What is Children’s Literature?

It may seem strange to think that there is some question as to what constitutes a children’s book for many after all this would seem like a question with an obvious answer. A children’s book was after all created for children. However Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain one of the books considered to be classical children’s literature was originally intended for adults and as indeed received some past censorship because of how interpret it was considered for children. The Grimm’s fairy tales also where written initially for adults, yet they where bought for children. This situation of children taking over what was supposed to be an book for adults has led to many problems. After all society then complains that the story was not appropriate for children, and so attacks to book. Further the book not being appropriate for children perhaps does cause some social problems. Yet we still seem to consider many such books as children’s literature.
Why is it books written for adults become children’s books? Or at least books read by children. Although it is perhaps impossible to state all the reasons for this situation, I would forward three theories on ways in which this can occur.
The first reason is that a book offers a fantastic reality, an imaginative story, children like such stories and so for whatever reason it is presumed that such imaginativeness is in the realm of children’s literature. This could for example be the case with Gulliver’s Travels and of course the Grimm’s Fairy Tales. In many ways I would argue it’s sad that if a story is fun and imaginative it is automatically pushed off into the realm of children. Not that children’s literature is lesser, indeed this imaginativeness has helped in many ways to make it superior to that created for adults. Rather it is sad that adults do not presume that such creative genius is worth more of their time.
Another reason which a book might become children’s literature is that it is about a child, for some reason a child character makes people automatically assume a child should read it, as if they are the only ones who can relate to a child. This is a ridiculous notion of course, we where all children and besides of which all such books where written by intelligent adults.
The final reason I will propose is that many books and works of art intended for adults become children’s as a means of expanding their reach or extending their life. This is why for example one will find the works of Jane Austen in the children’s literature section at the book store with a little charm.
This still does not answer the question of what is children’s literature. Part of the problem here may be that we have not yet truly defined the question, broad questions have broad answers. The question may be what should parents have their children read, or what should educators and those studying children’s literature study in order to learn about the impact of literature on children? In the case of the first question the answer is in regards to the parents beliefs and their kids reaction to things. If a parent does not believe their kid should be exposed to something then it does not constitute children’s literature for that kid. This definition of course makes the whole field of children’s books very difficult as there are so many differing views on what is acceptable for children to read.
However this problem would beg the question, is the purpose of the definition to help people study children’s literature or to help parents decide which books their kids can read? In the case of the purpose for study children’s literature would constitute all books which children regularly read. After all the purpose of study is to determine what is acceptable to read and what impact such readings have on children, as will as ways to make future books better. For this purpose to be effective all books which children read must be included. Part of the difficulty of course with determining what constitutes children’s literature is that there is some debate as to what children are.
After all different cultures have at times believed many different things about children. However I would point out that this in and of itself is exactly the point, childhood is viewed as different by different cultures. It is then a cultural definition, one which our society can answer and change. Certainly it is difficult for people to accept this idea, and for many the idea that the culture determines someone’s role is tantamount to prejudice, however when it comes to defining a state and an impact we are indeed looking at cultural variables. One cannot for example assume that a picture book based on the Impressionist style, and with Swedish Motifs would have the same impact on Americans as it does Japanese or Swedes. It is culture which determines the role literature plays in our lives so it is through a cultures definitions of something that that thing should be defined. Further accepting one cultures definition of what defines children and not another’s is prejudice.
In American culture this definition of child has been constructed in a way as Minors to the age of 18, however not all of these ages are considered children per say, they are teenagers, pre-teens, Elementary, Preschool, Toddlers and more. However as a society we have defined these groups and so a wish to understand their demographic must begin with the societies definitions of them. Arguing that a culture is wrong is often a mute point, just as literature is a social construct many of the emotions and impact surrounding it are too.
Children’s literature then according to my definition and the definition which will be found throughout this site is literature which impacts directly through reading a fairly decent percentage of the population which is considered children by the culture it is from. Or in the case of cross-cultural analysis such impacts will extend to ages determined by the culture with the oldest children or the largest definition of them. Why? Because in many cases especially historical ones children where considered adults fairly young, yet if we want to compare differences in impact between 8 year olds we must study both sets of 8 year olds. It is important to stress that this is not a means to push one cultures definition on another it is merely a research construct intended to help study literature, so that we can better understand its impact.
Ty Hulse has degree’s in art and psychology with both with a children’s and a cross-cultural focus. He is currently working to create the site Zeluna.net which discusses Children’s Literature and Picture Books, as will as Fairy Tales.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Ty_Hulse

Book Buying Guide for Babies and Toddlers

Deciding on which book to buy for your toddler or baby can feel tremendous when standing in the children’s area of your local book store. If you find yourself looking and just not knowing which books to buy or where to begin the helpful children’s book buying tips below will make short work of your shopping.
Where to Find Books for Babies and Toddlers
Your local library and garage sales are great places to find used books for children. Most libraries hold a used book sale each year where you can buy great children’s books at rock bottom prices. Libraries also have books available to borrow for babies and toddlers. This can be a great way to introduce new books to your children.
Book of the month clubs offer an opportunity to build up your own personal library in your home. There are a wide selection of children’s book of the month clubs available where you can select books from a catalog and order them from home. Your child will get excited about selecting a new book each month and then have great anticipation waiting for his or her new book to arrive in the mail.
Choosing Storage for Children’s Books
Books should always be accessible to young children. By storing books on low book shelves or in low drawers children will be encouraged to pick up books and read.
You may find that children feel a connection to books if they help make a storage container for their books. Try getting an old cardboard box or storage container and having your child decorate the box. When the decorating is finished your child can load the box with his or her favorite books and keep it down low where they can reach in and get a book any time.
Which Book is Best for Babies and Toddlers?
Young babies like to look at colorful board books that are easy to hold and easy to handle. Thick cardboard like books or books with soft sides and vinyl covers allow babies to chew without getting hurt.
Toddlers like to read books with easy to follow story lines and simple rhyming books. Toddlers also like books that relate to their life. Such as stories about potty training or going to school, something the toddler is doing in his life.
Picture books are great for both babies and toddlers. Babies like to look at the colorful pictures and toddlers like to make up story lines to go with the pictures.
Selecting a Time to Read to Children
Babies and toddlers just love to be read to. Any time of day will work for most children when it comes to reading. A nice routine of reading at bed time or after bath time is recommended by many child development specialists.
Just remember that children love to read and if your toddler brings you a book and asks you to read, you should take the time to do so. Reading will build a love of books and foster great memories of quiet time spent together.
Are you looking for more? Check out http://www.bargainkidsclothes.com - You can also find great parenting tips and fun activities to do with your children at http://www.bargainkidsclothes.com
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Shauna_Hanus
Books for Babies and Young Children
By Shauna Hanus

Choosing the best book for your baby or toddler can feel a bit overwhelming when you first begin. You may find yourself wondering, where is the best place to buy books for my child? How many books should my child have? Should I let my baby or toddler play with books? Here are the tips you need to launch your baby or toddler on a life long love of reading.
Finding Books for Babies and Toddlers
Finding affordable books for your baby or toddler is as easy as your local library. Many libraries offer board books that are wonderful for babies and toddlers. You can also watch for used book sales at your local library or check out garage sales in your area.
A quick internet search for child book of the month club will yield over 200 thousand results relating to book clubs for children. With a children’s book of the month club you will be able to select books from a catalog to have delivered directly to your home. The books are affordable and fun for kids. Your children will get excited each month when they are able to select which books to buy and then they will look forward to their monthly book delivery.
Storing Books for Children
Young children should be encouraged to open books and pretend to read on their own. Babies as young as 9 months to a year will open colorful board books and flip through the pages.
Keeping books accessible to babies and toddlers is as easy as setting up a low book shelf in your home to store all children’s books. You can also have your toddler decorate a cardboard box that is stored on the floor and filled with books. Even the car is a great place for books. Try keeping one or two favorite books in the car for your child to read while you are driving.
Selecting the Best Book for Babies and Toddlers
Babies up to about one year of age enjoy board books. This type of book has thick cardboard pages that turn easily. Soft cover and vinyl books are also available and allow babies to chew on the book with out harming themselves or the book.
Babies also like brightly colored books and books with pictures they can recognize. Animals, people, and everyday objects are a great place to start.
Toddlers like easy to turn pages and simple to follow story lines. Simple rhyming books that present a flowing rhythm engage toddlers and offer a soothing sound. Also look for books that tell a story without words. This gives toddlers the opportunity to read the pictures and make up a story.
When to Read to Young Children
When babies and young children are read to they are more likely to be successful in school and to develop a love for reading. Any time of day is a great time to read to children. Many experts agree that reading at bedtime offers a wonderful routine for children and parents. Each night before bed allow your child to select a book to read.
Be sure to remember that if your child wants to read, now is as good a time as any. When toddlers and young children ask you to read it is important to take the time and fill this need.
Want more? http://www.freebabystuff.com/ has what you need for baby. For more great parenting tips and fun activities for you and your baby visit us online at http://www.freebabystuff.com/
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Shauna_Hanus


How to Use Personalized Children’s Books as Learning Tools
By Caterina Christakos

How Personalized Child Books Can Be the Key to Faster Learning
Have you ever noticed how your child learned his or her name first, before mommy, daddy or anything else you tried to teach him? His name becomes equal to his identity. He immediately becomes more interested in objects and concepts as it relates to him.
A children’s story book that includes his name will instantly be more meaningful than a run of the mill children’s book. Personalized stories with life lessons that include his name and some of the things he loves to do will have that much more of a chance of really sinking in.
The more personal information included in the story, the more of an impact it will have on your child. Choose books that include their name, age, and activities that he truly enjoys.
A book that is catered to your child is one that he will have probably for the rest of his life. It is part of his upbringing now and a wonderful keepsake that he can share with his children later in life.
About The AuthorCaterina Christakos is a children’s book and how to write a children’s book author. To choose wonderful stories personalized for your child go to:http://www.allpersonalizedchildbooks.com/.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Caterina_Christakos


Children’s Books - Child’s First Introduction to The World of Print
By Angel Abdulnor
Board books are often a child’s first introduction to the world of print. Designed with infants and toddlers in mind, these specialty children’s books are chunky, with thick, study pages perfect for a young child’s exploring touch. Like most children’s books, board books are usually labeled with a target age range by the publisher. Board books are generally intended for children from birth to three years old.
Early children’s books come in many titles. Many classics of children’s literature are available in board book format, from the works of Dr. Seuss to bedtime staples like Goodnight Moon. These titles allow even the very youngest children to enjoy the whimsical stories and colorful illustrations of favorite stories without worry about torn pages.
Pocket sized board books often come in themed collections. Favorite children’s characters often star in collections of board books, which often come in creative packaging, intended to make getting the books out and putting them away just as much fun for your child as reading them. Other collections focus on a theme, such as letters of the alphabet.
Perhaps the most popular style of board book is the simple picture book. Each heavy, cardboard page contains a single word or concept, paired with a matching illustration. Available on subjects from dinosaurs and cars to colors and shapes, these children’s books build familiarity with basic early learning concepts and introduce the idea that words represent things we see around us.
Board books come in a range of different sizes. Small, pocket sized board books are perfect for crawling infants who are just learning to manipulate objects, while larger books are ideal for the toddler who wants a book just like Mommy’s.
The physical construction of board books is designed to withstand the rough treatment of children too young to know better. Unlike traditional bound paper books, the thick cardboard pages of board books are virtually indestructible. They resist tearing and make it easier for clumsy young fingers to turn pages.
Board books are also an exceptionally affordable addition to the family library. Small full color picture books are often priced at just a few dollars per title, while larger, full size full color books are priced around the same as hardcover children’s books. Building a collection of board books for the child in you life is an inexpensive way to provide an early introduction to the importance and enjoyment of reading.
Online Books Store Canada Deals ON Books Canada, where you can buy your books online and choose from biggest selection of books
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Angel_Abdulnor


Rare Book Stores
By Josh Riverside
Rare book stores, unlike rare books, can be located easily. There are hundreds of rare book stores which stock all sorts of rare books otherwise known as “antiquarian books.” Rare books are always in demand, as you never know when you would need them. Most of the book stores would have some collection of rare books, but selling rare books is a specialty, and that explains why there are exclusive rare book stores.
Most of the rare books are in fact books which are out of print or circulation. Just in case you are not able to locate your rare book in your neighborhood rare book store, you can always try shopping for them online. There are literally thousands of titles available online. A little bit of search and you can locate an online store. Locating an online store can be still made easy by visiting online directories that can guide you. Once located, you can go through the entire list of rare books at most of these online stores. Pay online and your rare book will be shipped to you in a day or two. One thing you should be careful about while purchasing rare books online is that to make sure that the rare book you are buying is rare. For instance, you could have chosen a book with the same title as that of a rare book, in which case the book you have chosen could be totally different from what you wanted.
Most of the online rare bookstores allow you to compare prices. It is always preferable that you compare prices before you make your purchase. One can also bid for rare books at auction Web sites.
Book Stores provides detailed information on Book Stores, Online Book Stores, Christian Book Stores, Adult Book Stores and more. Book Stores is affiliated with Book Club Questions.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Josh_Riverside


What Sells on eBay? Children’s Series Books Like Animorphs
By Eric Carlson
Children’s Series books like Animorphs are another thing to keep an eye out for while you are at Garage sales looking for items to sell on eBay. There are two reasons why these are great:
1. You can find them at most Garage sales in the Suburbs
2. You can buy them for cheap and resell them for a good profit.
When I say you can buy them for cheap, I am talking five to ten cents per book. When you find them at a garage sale, offer to buy them all for a nickel a piece. After that, you can always go a little higher depending on the series.
Here is a list of several good children’s book series to look out for:
* Animorphs by K.A. Applegate, Published by Scholastic. Series includes 54 books with 10 Companion books. Books resell for about $1 per book, if series is complete, up to $2.50 per book.
* Box Car Children by Gertrude Chandler Warner, Series includes 113 books. Re-Published by Scholastic. Newer books resell for $1 per book, Original series for much more.
* Captain Underpants by Dav Pilkey, Published by Scholastic. Series includes 9 books and counting. Books sell for at least $2 a book, more if newer books are included.
* Goosebumps by R.L. Stine, Original Series includes 62 books, Goosebumps series 2000 includes 24 books. Published by Scholastic. Resell for about $1 per book.
* Junie B. Jones by Barbara Park. Series includes 27 books. These resell for about $2 per book.
This is by no means an exhaustive list of books to sell on eBay. This is only a primer. You should do some research yourself, and make sure these are actually viable options, make a list of how much you would be willing to sell per book, etc…
Unlike selling other things on eBay, it is best not to split these up into smaller lots. But to try to sell them all together. The more complete the set, the higher your price will be. If you have an almost complete set, it might be worth it to buy the missing book on Amazon.
Happy hunting.
To find out more information on how to become a PowerSeller, and make more money on eBay please visit the eBay Selling Guide
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Eric_Carlson


The Benefits of Children’s Audio Books
By Jeannie Warner
There is a stigma that parents who let their children listen to audio books are depriving them of one thing or another. Whether it’s bonding time with their children or taking away the joy of reading, it’s just not true. Using audio books with your young child may very well be increasing a number of their developing skills. Here are a few reasons children’s audio books are a great learning tool.
Not all parents are the greatest readers. When children are toddlers, parents often read books to them near bedtime. Audio books use professional actors to record their story. Their voices are often smoother, softer and have more passion for the story. Parents spend so much time with work, their families and household chores that they can usually be wiped out and tired come reading time. If children are listening to someone read the story with enthusiasm, they’re more likely to respond to the story better.
A well-composed audio book will have a musical score and sound effects appropriate to the storyline. This will grasp a child’s attention and help them to visualize the story better, thus improving their creativity. They will hear words being pronounced correctly, and their vocabularies will start to blossom. Parents are quick to cast away audio books, but not realize that a lot of popular children’s toys talk and play music just like these books do; yet parents will continue to purchase these items.
As the children grow up listening to audio books, they’ll come to understand that they can read more stories by the same authors if they’re interested. Children who see movies or television shows they like will often buy books based off of their favorite characters. Audio books work the same way. The children will want to continue enjoying their favorite characters and authors. If anything, children’s audio books promote reading.
It’s important to develop listening skills in children at an early age. Audio books for children teach them that skill. Children know that they must remain attentive to hear the full story, and that’s important for them once they begin school. Learning to listen as toddlers through audio books will help polish their attentiveness for later in life.
Using audio books while on travel is a great idea. It’s better than putting a non-educational DVD in while on the road. It can become a family affair. The book can be paused, and the whole family can discuss what they think may happen next, or how they feel about particular characters. This will polish the child’s conversational skills and prove to be a great learning experience for the child. It also helps to bring families closer together.
So parents should think twice before tossing the idea of children’s audio books aside. There are so many great benefits children can gain from listening to these stories. They’ll gain valuable thinking, listening and conversational skills that will help them in life for many years to come.
For a great selection of children’s audio books including free audiobook downloads, please visit http://www.audiobookfest.com/
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jeannie_Warner


Niche eBay Products - The Hidden Goldmine of Children’s Books
By Rachel Annarve
Everyone realises that selling on eBay requires good products. What everyone does not realise, is that many everyday articles are actually excellent sellers.
In the second of this series of articles, I will go through a niche product category that most would never give a second thought, children’s books.
Almost everyone has gone to a garage sale or second-hand store and checked the books. Usually you throw aside the children’s books in case there is something valuable underneath! Most people will know about the first edition Harry potter books that sold for high amounts of money, but how many of those are just lying at sales?
The real goldmine is in more obscure titles. Here is a small sample of sold items on eBay in November;
* Lang (Andrew) The Blue Fairy Book Hardcover first Ed 1889 $1,420.20
* Nesbit (Edith) Miss Mischief, Boards 1880 $568.08
* Hardy Boys HIDDEN GOLD RED COVER 1930 Hardcover with dust Jacket $2184 !
Now obviously, these 3 examples are the top sellers at this time period and you’re probably thinking that you’ll never come across these books. Actually there are so many children’s books that you can pick up for 20c or less than $1 which will sell for between $25 -$300
1. If it is a hardcover book and has the paper dust-jacket, that is a good start.
2. Now check the edition. Does it only have “printed in (any year),” does it have 2nd impression (or any impression) or this edition printed in (any year).
3. A very general rule would be the earlier the impression, the better. There is however always exclusions to this rule, which is why you should spend an hour or two simply writing down the authors that consistently achieve good prices.
I have made a small list here which only took 5 minutes to compile, so you can see how easy it is to do!
* L. Frank Baum (author of The Wizard of Oz) -This author regularly gets prices Between $30-$200
* Enid Blyton (Author of Famous 5) -regular sales between $10-$50
* Dr Seuss (Author of Cat in the Hat ect…) - often up to $200 for first editions
The best way to research this on eBay is to do a search that shows completed auctions on children’s books from the highest price.
There are also many popular children’s figures that often appeal not only to book collectors, but pop culture and other collectors. A great example of this is Mickey Mouse and many of the Disney Characters. Star Wars books are also an interesting market as even the newer books seem to have a wide collector base. When looking at older children’s books, the ones with large clear well drawn illustrations and novelty books are a good bet. Things such as older pop-up books also appeal to a wide range of collectors.
A growing number of people are also looking for pop culture icons such as Gerry Anderson. Some have sold annuals related to Gerry Anderson TV series for over $50! Another thing to think about is, even when you don’t see anything promising, collections of the same author can go for substantially more than single books. People like to purchase a collection already put together rather than having to pay for shipping on each one.
Some recent good sellers have been;
- The Hardy Boys Series
- Lemony Snickets Series
- Judy Blume Books
- Roald Dahl books
- The Nancy drew series
And finally, there has been an interesting amount of older Little Golden Books selling for considerably high prices. This is an interesting trend considering how cheap these were when released. Some of the earlier ones are constantly reaching over $100!
This really is a fascinating niche market on eBay and it does pay to do a little research first. Again, this is something you can pick up at garage sales and goodwill stores for next to nothing.
Thanks for reading and Good Luck!
Rachel Annarve
The author of this article has been selling on eBay for over 6 years and currently makes a full-time living selling in online auctions.
For the unabridged article and more in this series, please visit http://auctionresource.co.nz/
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Rachel_Annarve
New Baby Gifts - Books are the Answer By Sarah Garr

There are hundreds of adorable new baby gift baskets out there. Some are actually adorable and useful. Finding a new baby gift basket with quality children's books is like striking gold in a dark mine shaft.
Babies should be read to from the moment they can sit in mom or dad's lap. Even though the new little one won't understand the story line or even some of the basic language, the sounds of a parent's voice is one the most soothing things for an infant. Small infants love sharp contrasting colors. There are numerous books that show black and white designs with red accents. These make a young baby's eyes wide with excitement.
As the child grows, simple picture books are appealing. Colorful pictures with simple text are ideal. Many babies, as they reach a few months old, love the texture of the feel and learn type books. This is a great way for a parent to show new vocabulary, whether it is farm animals to fruits and vegetables. The parent can repeat the words while the child can feel the texture that was made into the book. A great extension of this reading time is to show your child the things from the book in real life situations. This could range from walking through a petting zoo to exploring the produce at the local grocery store.
Books with rhyme and repetition are huge hits. Most of the time mom and dad will have the story memorized from reading it so much. Sometimes, you can start saying the book from memorization and your one year old will actually go locate the book. Rhymes are a great way for the child to develop language. Some rhyming books use silly words as part of the rhyming, but as the child starts doing this also, it shows that the child is progressing in phonological awareness which is crucial to reading success. Hearing the sounds and being able to reproduce the sounds are necessary components to triumph when it comes to language development.
So, when you are searching for that unique baby gift, you can be the dock master that sets the ship of reading sailing for any new child.
About The Author...Sarah Garr is a veteran teacher by trade, but when she had her son, Tate, she knew her life was going to change in more ways than she could possibly imagine. She intended to continue teaching while my husband played the role of "Awesome Stay At Home Dad". However, she couldn't stand it. She loved her kids at school, but every time she hugged a Kindergartener she felt an overwhelming need to be at home hugging her own handsome son. When Sarah is not chasing after her energetic toddler she is busy coddling her new baby, Sweet Tater Baby Gifts. Sweet Tater Baby Giftsoffers a full line of unique and personalized baby gifts and baby gift ideas. Come visit www.SweetTaterBabyGifts.comtoday!
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com


Beyond the Words, a Child's VoiceBy: Patricia Gatto
Voices have a way of falling into a pattern, not unlike the sound of constant rain. At first, the rain is obvious as it dramatically announces its arrival, and for a brief moment, you acknowledge the intrusion. But slowly, the rhythmic sounds fade into the background, becoming nothing more than a distant drone.We are fortunate to have the ability to block out sounds like the pouring rain; otherwise, it would be impossible for us to concentrate. But what happens when the rain is actually the voice of a child, and you are so focused on your own thoughts that you forget to hear?Even the most dedicated parent or caregiver can fail to hear the understated nuances of a child's plea. It's impossible to play detective and uncover the meaning behind every word and every gesture. Sometimes a whine is simply a whine. But if your busy schedule has you constantly preoccupied, you may be unintentionally shutting your child out. And if you're not there for your child, who will be?Emotional and spiritual wellbeing are just as important as physical health. Even at a young age, you can help teach your child a simple technique that provides you with a means to hear the voice beyond the words. It's a little trick I learned from my Mom, and all you need is a piece of paper and a pencil.I grew up in a large family. With five children, my Mom was concerned that she might miss a cue, a subtle hint that would indicate when one of us was in trouble or needed to talk, so she came up with a plan when we were very young.Mom gathered us around the kitchen table and took out a piece of paper and a pencil and she proceed to explain her concept at the most basic level."Sometimes Mommy is busy, but I am never, ever too busy for my children. I promise that I will always make time for you, but I need you to let me know if you are having a problem."Then she drew a picture and showed it to us. "If something is bothering you, draw a picture of a sad face and give it to me. Mommy will never ignore it. This is our secret code and I will be there to help you."We were a demanding bunch, and I'm sure it wasn't easy for my Mom. Sometimes that note would arrive right in the middle of her making dinner, or while she was on the phone or when she finally sat down to watch TV. But she would always take that child with the sad-faced picture aside. Many times, she would have to coax the problem out of us by asking a series of questions, but we always felt better afterward.As we got older, this little plan kept the doors of communication wide open. In those difficult, embarrassing moments of childhood, Mom was always true to her word. Whenever she received a note, everything would stop and the writer would receive her private and undivided attention.Interesting though, were the far-reaching benefits of this little plan. You see, by giving us this additional means to be heard, we were taught that our concerns, problems and opinions were valid and important. We learned how to express our feelings and we knew the luxury of having someone there to listen. But we also became responsible individuals and learned valuable lessons in honesty and accountability. Our Mom showed us how to keep a promise. And as a family, we faced our problems together and head on.Although the idea was simple, it was also powerful. This very wise, sensitive, nurturing woman empowered her young children with the right to be heard and the gift of confidence. Today I use this concept in my own family and in my work as well.As advocates for children's rights, my husband and I speak about the consequences of bullying. The best defense against a bully is to tell an adult, but we are well aware that this is a difficult task for some children. Even when a child is otherwise vocal, discussing harassment at the hands of a peer can be painful, embarrassing, or scary.We take great care to explain that unless a child makes their concerns known, adults can't help. We explain that sometimes adults don't pay attention, but this doesn't mean they don't care. We encourage children not to give up and tell them to reach out to an adult by writing a note or drawing a picture.Someday, if a child hands you a note, we hope that even if you weren't raised with a secret family code for "please listen to me," you will stop what you are doing and focus on the voice of the child before you.
About The Author... Patricia Gatto and John De Angelis are the authors of MILTON"S DILEMMA, the tale of a lonely boy"s magical journey to friendship and self-acceptance. As advocates for literacy and children"s rights, the authors speak at schools and community events to foster awareness and provide children with a safe and healthy learning environment. For more information, please visit Joyful Productions at http://www.joyfulproductions.com/pgatto@ptd.net


Why Reading Aloud To Your Child Is Important by Kent Johnson

Okay, so your child loves to watch television, play video games, surf on the Internet, and listen to music. And there's nothing wrong with those activities, as long as they're used in moderation. Most parents would also love to see their kids participate in more constructive activities -- like reading children's books -- but the trick is to get your little ones to actually sit down and crack open a book a few times per week.One way to start is by sitting down and reading aloud to your children. By reading aloud to your kids, you're showing them how to enjoy children's books, the English language, the wonders of a good story, and hopefully, you're instilling a love of reading and learning. Many kids associate books with the drudgeries of school and homework, but you want to show them how a well written children's book can be an exciting adventure, a real pleasure, as their imagination takes them to places they've never been to visit with people and characters they've never met.According to a recent US government study, there's a direct relationship with reading aloud to your children and childhood literacy rates. Reading children's books and other materials to your children is not only a great educational head start for pre-school, but also a wonderful social activity, and a chance to spend quallity time with your kids. Reading to children is shown to have a positive effect on children’s literacy outcomes, the government report concludes. Through experience with books, children gain important exposure to written language. They begin making connections between the spoken word and the printed word. Policymakers contend that it is important to read to your child.Regrettably, few children today seem to read for pleasure. In one study, only 7 out of 10 9-year-olds said that they enjoy reading as a pastime, compared with 78% five years ago, while for 11-year-olds, the proportion has declined from 77% to 65%. Children said they preferred watching television to going to the library or reading. But the biggest changes in attitudes were among boys. In Year 6, only 55% of boys said they enjoyed stories compared with 70% in 1998.So getting your children -- especially males -- to read, and enjoy reading, is a real challenge these days. And again, one way to tackle that challenge is to read to your children aloud. One technique is to make reading a children's book a game, an interactive adventure that you can both enjoy. After all, this is another way to spend some quality time with your kids, which is what they want anyway. Another way to use children’s books and literature to teach is through the so-called "Charlotte Mason" method. In this method of teaching, the child "tells back," in his or her own words, a short book or poem, or a chapter of a longer book. The child is forced to focus on the story, and understand its meaning. This type of verbal narration is especially effective in younger children who may not have the writing skills necessary to put their thoughts down on paper. The goal is to get your child to open a book for fun, on their own, without prodding from you or their teachers in school. I can remember my own excitement and fascination when I discovered the Lord Of The Rings trilogy as young teenager, and how many hours of entertainment and enjoyment I culled from the pages of that classic fantasy series.
About The Author... Kent Johnson – Reading Expert and Career Coach Visit Books To Order Personalized BooksYour source for personalized children’s books that make reading fun.


Raising Children Who Love to Read By Carol Boles

If you’re wondering why some children grow up to become successful readers and possess a love for reading, the answer is simple. Their parents have made a commitment to their reading development.
Children can begin a journey to reading success and enjoyment when parents commit to:
- reading to children as young as six months old. Begin reading when they are barely sitting up and their eyes are beginning to focus. Select simple, colorful board books and read them aloud with expression. Point to pictures, identify characters or animals and talk about the story.
- a schedule for reading aloud until children are independent readers. Modeling good reading allows children to hear reading that is fluid and full of expression. Parents should allow children to select books as well as select books themselves. When parents introduce new books, this helps children develop a sense of the kinds of books they like.
- to making visits to the library until children are old enough to go there on their own. Show children visiting the library will become a part of their lives. Help them choose books to read or have read aloud. If children are older talk about the books they’ve chosen. Parents should select books themselves and talk about what they’re reading as well.
- to taking their children to books stores in their strollers, through the elementary, middle and high school years. Buy them a drink or snack, and browse the colorful displays and shelves full of books. Both parents and children should leave with a book.
- to reading themselves. Children naturally emulate their parent’s behavior. When parents possess a love for reading their children usually do as well. Parent should always have a novel they’re reading and set aside time for “read ins” with their children.
When parents commit to their children’s reading education, this nurtures reading development and an enjoyment of books. And, all the while those parents have had a great time enjoying great books themselves.
About The Author...Carol Boles has a master's degree in Special Reading and an Educational Specialist degree in Curriculum and Instruction. She has more than ten years experience teaching K-12 reading in public schools. She now manages her own business and is a member of The Lieurance Group, a freelance writers cooperative. Find out more about her writing services at http://www.teacherspetplace.blogspot.com/and http://www.lieurancegroup.blogspot.com/or e-mail her at Cwrites-56@hotmail.com
Article Source: http://ezinearticles.com/?expert=Carol_Boles

Choosing Children's Books

ByRobert Grazian

Children need to have a variety of reading experiences if they are going to learn to make good decisions. How to choose children's books for your students is going to be challenging task, but if you follow a few recommended steps, you should end up with a variety of good, informational and interesting books for them to explore as they become discerning readers and decision makers.
Start your search by looking at the covers of books, the first thing your students will see. Your younger students will appreciate a cover that has primary colors, is simple, yet eye catching. The title of the book should be short enough to catch the interest of your reader, yet long enough to tell him or her what the book is about. Photos and clear, crisp illustrations on the cover will appeal to your students and entice them to pick the book up and open it.
The next step in the process of how to choose children's books for your students is to review the topic or content of the book. Your young readers will want to read books that are interesting, full of fun and adventure. These students are surrounded by information and they will want to read books that are filled with accurate as well as reliable information. To verify this, check the references provided by the author, review his or her credentials, and look for evidence of background research on the topic being presented.
The final three items to pay particular attention to when learning how to choose children's books for your students are:
• Illustrations: Graphic or visual elements in a text are sure to keep the reader coming back for more as long as they are appropriate for the book. They should be large enough so the child can determine what they are but not so big that they distract from the content of the book. There should be captions and or titles that are simple, yet explain the graphic adequately.
• Organization: Children's books should be organized in a way that will provide a clear, smooth transition between text and illustrations. If the book warrants it, there should be a table of contents and a glossary that the young reader can easily navigate to find items of interest.
• Font size and Type: This is the final step in your quest to discover how to choose children's books for your students. Font size and type is important for a number of reasons, readability being the most important. For younger children, the letters should be large and the font style simple. Small, more ornate fonts will be hard to read, distracting them from their goal: comprehension of the material. Check the spacing and placement of the words on the page to be sure the students can easily follow the story from one page to the next.
Choosing which books your young readers will want to read should not be difficult, despite the sheer numbers of available books out there, as long as you follow the steps outlined here.
Robert Grazian is an accomplished niche website developer and author.
To learn more about [http://rarechildrensbookstoday.info/choosing-childrens-books/]children's books visit [http://rarechildrensbookstoday.info/]Rare Children's Books Today for current articles and discussions.
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ABC Books That Won't Make You Want to Rip Your Hair Out (At Least For the First 500 Reads)

By Christie Stockstill

By the time my son was born, he already had a bookshelf full of books. What else would you expect from a baby whose mother teaches English? Since he was my first child, I really had little knowledge of what one was "supposed" to read to a newborn. As far as I can tell, it doesn't matter if you read Sports Illustrated, The Economist, The Bible or the dictionary to a newborn; they just love to hear your voice, and I operate under the theory that limiting a baby's exposure to new and challenging words (assuming that he will not understand) is to do him a disservice. Neither my husband nor I have shied away from books that were "too advanced" for him, and I can see that it is paying off.
Having now praised the benefits of high-level texts, let me go back to the basics: those building blocks to communication: letters. ABC books. I confess to having no fewer than fifteen different alphabet books, and that's not counting the Sesame Street series of 26 books (one for each letter). By the way, those books are incredible, and Xander loves them: the familiar characters, the rhymes, the silliness, everything, and I give that series of books a lot of credit for Xander's interest in words and reading.
A few other ABC books for super young readers that you won't mind reading over and over:
Animal Action ABC by Karen Pandell, Handprint Books- I love this one for several reasons. All of the ABCs match up to action words. Kids are inundated with nouns; it's wonderful to provide a book of 26 great verbs like charge, inflate, and leap! Each letter/action word is accompanied by a full color photo of an animal in action, in addition to a picture of a child doing the same thing. In our family, reading this book would often require all of us attempting the suggested action, as well. This was, and still is, one of Xander's favorites.
The Elephant Alphabet by Gene Yates, Kidsbooks- This one is really funny. Every page depicts a boldly colored elephant trying to mold himself into the shape of a particular letter. The caption for each picture contains several words containing the particular letter: "G elephant gulps garlic and turns green."
All of these books have enhanced Xander's ability to hear letter sounds. Early on, he was able to identify the first letters of words he didn't even know. To encourage this, we enunciated letter sounds, played quiz-type games, looked at other books and fun flash cards, and showed him what words look like as we read. I also have to give props to a DVD from Leap Frog called The Letter Factory. Xander loved it, and the songs stuck with him.
Last, if you've had it with a particular book, just put it away for awhile. "Find" it again later; your child will be excited and happy, and you may even like it again, yourself.
Christie Stockstill
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